Snap a Trashy Selfie

Greenpeace Trashy Selfie
To mark Clean Up Australia Day this Sunday 2 March, Greenpeace is asking us to send them a Trash Selfie for a social media initiative that takes on the plastic bottle and can behemoth, Coca-Cola.

As more than 7,000 Clean Up Australia events take place across the country, Greenpeace hopes to triple rates of recycling nationwide so that it’s Clean Up Australia Day, every day.

#TrashySelfie is described as 'a fun new social media campaign starring you'.

Here’s how it’s done. Just grab a used can or bottle, take your best trashy self-portrait using your phone or camera, then upload it within seconds using the new purpose-built website. Greenpeace will then feature the best images for a series of public ads designed to encourage key decision maker, Victorian Liberal Premier Denis Napthine, to make the right choice.

The ads will appear right in the heart of his electorate in Warrnambool, which covers Victoria’s beautiful Great Ocean Road.

'This isn’t your average petition. It’s all about being a bit cheeky, a bit bold and getting noticed by the public and media as well,' states the organisation in its call to action.

According to Greenpeace, Coca-Cola is fighting Cash for Containers – a recycling program that allows consumers to claim a 10 cent refund simply for recycling our used bottles and cans.

It says: 'The program’s been a big success in South Australia for 30 years: recycling rates there are more than double the national average. But Coke doesn’t want the scheme spreading any further for fear of losing a few cents from its bottom line. Coke executives have been rolling out some pretty trashy tactics including lawsuits, misleading PR campaigns, dodgy reports, and allegedly even buying up environmental groups to push their message in parliament.'

Premier Napthine is considering taking on Coke by announcing Cash for Containers in Victoria before this year's election. If he follows through it could kick-start a domino effect across Australia, which even the likes of Coca-Cola would be powerless to stop.

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